When a Cold is a Catastrophe

I’m sick.

Over the weekend, I got a fairly nasty cold, and I’m still recovering. To an adult who has control of her anxiety, a cold is an annoyance. For anxious children, however, even minor illnesses can be terrifying.

Children prone to catastrophic thinking are often extremely creative in their fears, especially if they don’t have a good understanding of relevant anatomy.  Sinus pressure is likely to make an anxious young child worry that his head is going to explode, but it may also make him worry that worms have crawled into his nose in the night.  As long as you’re respectful and compassionate, I think it’s okay to sometimes poke gentle fun at your child’s most adorable fears.

To keep things playful instead of traumatizing, acknowledge the child’s fear, explain that the fear itself is a symptom (of anxiety or an anxiety disorder), and make sure the child knows you are on her side and will protect her.  Most importantly, keep even gentle teasing one-on-one; a beloved teacher or parent joking about nose-worms could be comforting and sweet, but additional participants may intentionally or unintentionally humiliate or bully the child.  Also, be careful about joking about plausible consequences of symptoms, such as an ear infection leading to a ruptured eardrum.  Most anxious kids won’t find that sort of “joke” funny.

Below is a list of common cold symptoms and the fears they may inspire in anxious children and adolescents.  Some of the fears are silly, but it’s important to realize that intelligence does not necessarily protect children from anxiety.  A child or teen who knows her fears are unfounded may still be plagued by them.  If your child or student complains of one of the following fears, explicitly disprove his unfounded fears (“sinus pressure will NEVER make your head explode, no matter what) and deemphasize any real risks that don’t require action.

Being able to predict some of your child or student’s fears may help you to better remove those fears.  Just make sure you never inadvertently suggest a new fear: “Ooooh, ear pressure? Don’t worry, I’m sure your eardrums won’t explode!”

Symptom Possible Fears
Cough Suffocation, lung cancer, internal bleeding due to violent cough
Headache Tumor, concussion, meningitis
Pressure, ears Eardrum rupturing, deafness
Pressure, eyes Eyes “popping out”/exploding, blindness
Pressure, sinuses Head exploding, tumors, burst blood vessels
Sore throat Losing the ability to speak
“Stuffy nose” Suffocation, anosmia
Swollen glands Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Parents, note that many over the counter and prescription cold medicines can cause anxiety or panic in individuals with anxiety disorders.  Talk to your pediatrician for more information.  Curious about alternative cold remedies? Read this informative article from Mayo Clinic.

Antibiotic Safety Information
Colds are caused by viruses, NOT bacteria.  Therefore, antibiotics will NOT help prevent, mitigate, or cure a cold.  The misuse of antibiotics helps create resistance strains of bacteria (such as MRSA), and taking antibiotics when you don’t need them can sometimes hurt you. Your body is full of “good” bacteria that helps you digest foods and fight off infection. Children and adults should only take antibiotics when they are prescribed by a real medical doctor.  Always take antibiotics exactly as prescribed.

Advertisements